Tag Archives: mobile

How the Consumer IT Market is Driving Business Continuity Management

DRI ANZ

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For many aspects of IT, the business market takes its cue from developments in the consumer sector. Even if other items like servers, databases and virtualisation are still enterprise-centric, developments in tablet PCs and smartphones are driven first of all by what private users want. These mobile computing devices are accounting for an increasingly large part of IT everywhere. That means that if you want to see what will happen in the business market tomorrow, look at the consumer market today. Tablets and smartphones also open up new possibilities for effective business continuity management. But other consumer IT innovations are contributing to changes in BCM too.

Consumer IT has also given us social networks. At first they were a means for making friends, sharing news and expressing opinions. When business discovered the power of social media, it started to put them to use to run operations more effectively, share knowledge better and engage employees. It also spotted the potential for Twitter and Facebook, the two largest social networks, for keeping stakeholders and customers informed in times of crisis. Likewise, several project management software applications now offer internal Twitter-like and Facebook-like functionality for internal social networking to help project teams to better achieve their objectives.

However, that doesn’t mean that every consumer IT novelty will automatically cross over into business. Wearable computing for example may help you to keep tabs on your kids (which may be important), but business users don’t seem to have been convinced so far. One exception may be Google Glass. With its voice recognition, camera and miniature screen, it has already found its way into a number of business applications. It could also help in business continuity situations where hands-free real-time two-way information access and communication is required. And for the future? While Google makes up its mind about an official release date for Google Glass, the 3D web, mobile chips under your skin and the totally connected everywhere Internet of Things provide food for BCM thought too.

Enterprise IT Trends and the Wider-Spread Effect on Business Continuity

DRI ANZ

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Business continuity does not operate in a vacuum. Far from it, BC must interwork with the trends and developments in organisations, in particular in their IT operations. Whether from a standpoint of people, business objectives or technology, business continuity managers must remain in tune with the undercurrents of change at work in their enterprises. Often these are interlinked. To meet goals, departments acquire new IT technology independently of the established IT department, which leads to changes in business continuity roles and responsibilities. Examples are sales forces increasingly equipped with mobile solutions, and marketing teams building their own systems to manage market and customer information.

While the principles of business continuity hold good, their application is being modified. Enterprises are increasingly aware of the possibilities to look beyond the internal IT organisation and partner with external providers for data processing, storage and application development. They are becoming more realistic about offshore projects: high quality services are available, but now longer at the bargain prices touted some time ago. On the other hand, third parties can often accelerate company IT developments dramatically. Timeframes become weeks instead of years, with all the advantages and challenges that such rapidity brings.

Where else should you be looking to stay in touch with enterprise IT trends and their impact on business continuity? Surprisingly perhaps, the consumer IT world is a good place for information. Much of what is being offered to the public now finds its way afterwards into working organisations: smartphones, tablets, mobile applications and BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) computing are all examples. While specialised technologies for large scale data storage and high-end processing are likely to remain within a business context, end-user IT increasingly draws on any useful source available. Keeping an open mind and an active interest in these different influences is all part of a business continuity manager’s job.