Tag Archives: BYOD

Have You Completely Understood Your Data Recovery Needs?

DRI ANZ

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The whole is greater than the sum of the parts. Although you may have planned for individual components of data recovery after an incident, the overall impact must also be assessed. An example is the need to recover operations that have been successfully transferred to a disaster recovery backup site, in order to have them running once again on the primary site. In some cases, this final step can be even more complicated than the initial move out to the secondary site. Or you may have forgotten to include computing systems that live outside the perimeter of ‘official’ enterprise backup. A combined top-down and bottom-up approach can help to cover all the bases.

The top-down part of your understanding is driven by knowledge of the organisation’s overall objectives and critical sub-objectives. When you know which the mission-critical activities are, you can establish which data must be safeguarded and recoverable at all times for those activities. You can map out the systems they run on, the people who use those systems and the ‘go-to’ person for the security of any given system. With this portfolio of goals and systems in mind, you will be able to define any necessary priorities and take precautions to make sure that data recovery is done as fast as possible, but without overwhelming any individual application.

The bottom-up part requires observation of what is in fact being used by different employees or departments. Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) computing may mean data being stored on mobile computing devices that have not yet been included in systematic data safeguards. Strategically important spreadsheets may be held on local systems that are isolated from your data centre servers. All these devices need a suitable path defined back upwards to bring them into the data recovery plan. When you can track every top-level goal down to its constituent systems and data, and every IT resource back up to a business activity and objective, your understanding of your data recovery needs will be measurably improved.

Enterprise IT Trends and the Wider-Spread Effect on Business Continuity

DRI ANZ

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Business continuity does not operate in a vacuum. Far from it, BC must interwork with the trends and developments in organisations, in particular in their IT operations. Whether from a standpoint of people, business objectives or technology, business continuity managers must remain in tune with the undercurrents of change at work in their enterprises. Often these are interlinked. To meet goals, departments acquire new IT technology independently of the established IT department, which leads to changes in business continuity roles and responsibilities. Examples are sales forces increasingly equipped with mobile solutions, and marketing teams building their own systems to manage market and customer information.

While the principles of business continuity hold good, their application is being modified. Enterprises are increasingly aware of the possibilities to look beyond the internal IT organisation and partner with external providers for data processing, storage and application development. They are becoming more realistic about offshore projects: high quality services are available, but now longer at the bargain prices touted some time ago. On the other hand, third parties can often accelerate company IT developments dramatically. Timeframes become weeks instead of years, with all the advantages and challenges that such rapidity brings.

Where else should you be looking to stay in touch with enterprise IT trends and their impact on business continuity? Surprisingly perhaps, the consumer IT world is a good place for information. Much of what is being offered to the public now finds its way afterwards into working organisations: smartphones, tablets, mobile applications and BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) computing are all examples. While specialised technologies for large scale data storage and high-end processing are likely to remain within a business context, end-user IT increasingly draws on any useful source available. Keeping an open mind and an active interest in these different influences is all part of a business continuity manager’s job.